Apple Mac OS X Lion for Mac - Free download and software reviews - CNET Download.com

Apple Mac OS X Lion for Mac

CNET Editors' review

The bottom line: Mac OS X Lion is definitely a worthy upgrade for all Intel Mac users. Featuring several interface enhancements and useful new features across all the core apps, Mac OS X Lion is an excellent update for the price.

Review:
When Apple showed off Mac OS X Lion at the Worldwide Developers Conference keynote speech earlier this year, it was clear the company had paid attention to its successes with the popular iOS devices, and was now beginning to include successful iOS features in its flagship OS. Also, with Apple laptops and tablets now far outpacing desktop sales, Apple has moved from a primarily desktop computer company to embrace mobile computing. This release of Mac OS X seems to be a reflection of Apple's successes in those categories.

With this eighth major release of the big-cat OS, Apple is adding more than 250 features. Some are big interface changes, whereas others are smaller refinements with the clear aim of making certain actions easier. Priced at $29.99, the upgrade adds plenty to make it worthwhile for most Mac users, but those who do not have Snow Leopard will need to pay for that upgrade as well. Lion can only be downloaded via the Mac App Store, which was introduced with Snow Leopard.

Mac OS X Lion


Installation
Installation for Mac OS X Lion requires a couple of steps. Start by running Software Update and check for Mac App Store updates--this is always a good practice before a major upgrade, to make sure you have the latest versions of Apple's core apps.

From there, simply navigate to the Mac App Store in Snow Leopard, purchase the upgrade, and begin downloading. You will need to have an account with Apple via the Mac or iTunes Store in order to purchase Mac OS X Lion. The OS is about 4GB (approximately the size of a full-length film download), so depending on your connection, you may want to start the download before going to bed or leaving for work. When the download is finished, the Mac OS X Lion installer appears in the Dock and launches automatically.

Mac OS X Lion installs in place, so you won't need to create a separate disk or run the installation off an external drive. All of your photos, documents, applications, and other saved files will be there when you're finished with the upgrade. Once the installation is complete, your Mac will automatically restart and you'll be ready to start exploring Mac OS X Lion. Apple also told us that Snow Leopard users migrating data to a new Mac with Lion should first grab the Migration Assistant update for Snow Leopard. This will ensure all of your files, photos, and information will be smoothly transferred to the new system.

Other download options: Apple recognizes that 4GB can be a big download, especially for users without broadband. Users who do not have broadband access at home, work, or school will be able to download Lion at all Apple retail stores. If there are no stores close to you, you'll need to wait until August when Apple says Lion will be made available on a USB thumbdrive through the Apple Store (http://www.apple.com) for $69.

New features
Multitouch gestures: With the success of touch-screen iOS devices and sales of Mac notebooks outpacing desktops, it's only fitting that Apple would make multitouch gestures a priority in Mac OS X Lion. Whether you're using the trackpad on the MacBook Pro, the MacBook Air, or the Magic Trackpad for desktops, you'll be able to take advantage of multitouch gestures that get you where you want to go quickly without having to navigate using a mouse. The Magic Mouse offers alternative gestures as well, so you won't be left out in the cold if you prefer a more traditional mouse.

Mac OS X Lion

Mac OS X Lion offers several new and useful multitouch gestures that are easy to learn and save you time as you navigate your Mac.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

Even the feel of gestures seem smoother, which Apple says is not a change in how the functions work, but are attributable to new animations for things like swiping, zooming, and momentum scrolling. Whatever the explanation, it works well.

In Mac OS X Lion, Apple has rethought the concept of scrolling through pages by making the idea of the scroll bar mostly obsolete. Now you can swipe with two fingers to scroll through a Web page or document, but the document moves as though you are actually moving it with your hand. This is different from former scrolling methods, where you would scroll downward with the scroll bar to make a Web page move upward, for example. This might take some getting used to for many people, but we found it very intuitive once we got used to "grabbing" a Web page or scrollable document and moving it. The scroll bar is not completely a thing of the past, however, because it still shows up to indicate where you are on a page and disappears once you're done scrolling--it's just that you will mostly no longer need to use it.

Some of the more-useful gestures we found were the aforementioned two-finger scrolling, a three-finger swipe upward to open Mission Control (more on this later), and the three-finger swipe to the side to switch between full-screen applications. All of these gestures are very fluid and intuitive and--once you remember the important ones--should become second nature.

Full-screen apps: One of the more obvious differences between the Windows and Mac operating systems throughout the years was Windows' ability to easily switch (or maximize) to full screen, while Mac apps would always launch (and remain) in a window. With Mac OS X Lion, you're now able to switch the core Mac apps to a full-screen view using a diagonal arrow icon in the top right of the app window. Apple's Mac software that's separate from the operating system, like iWork and the iLife apps, now have this functionality as well, but you'll need to update them through the Mac App Store to add full-screen capabilities. Apple says that full screen will be available as an API to third-party developers as well, so expect many of your favorite apps to soon be updated with full-screen support.

Mac OS X Lion

Several of the core apps can now be run in full-screen mode so you can work (or play) without distractions. Apple says third-party developers will be able to add full-screen functionality to their apps as well.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

Once in full-screen view, you'll be able to use multitouch gestures like the three-finger swipe horizontally to smoothly move between applications. If you want to see the Dock while in full screen, move the mouse to the bottom of the screen, take your finger off the mouse then swipe down again. Apple has stuck to this particular design aesthetic for many years by not implementing this basic feature, and we're really glad to be able to finally use apps full screen in Lion.

Mission Control: Mac OS X has offered many ways throughout the years to quickly navigate to open apps and open windows through various iterations of what Apple calls Expose. But with Lion, you'll now have Mission Control, which displays all your open apps and windows so it's easy to find everything you're currently working on in one screen. Apple also integrated Spaces (separate desktops to organize your work) into Mission Control, with the use of a floating icon in the upper right corner of the Mission Control window. Now, if you want to move work to a separate space, you'll enter Mission Control, then click and drag the windows to the icon to create an extra desktop.

Mac OS X Lion

Mission Control takes the best things about Spaces and Expose and ties them together in one useful screen. With a simple three-finger swipe upward, you'll have everything running on your Mac at your fingertips.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

We found earlier versions of Expose to be somewhat confusing, with different buttons for different actions causing you to have to experiment to find the right key to see all windows open in an application. With Mission Control, your open apps are displayed across the top with the Expose view of all open windows at the bottom--no confusing options. You still have Function keys (with new obvious icons on the new MacBook Air and presumably on Macs to come later), but you can also do a three-finger swipe upward to open the unified Mission Control screen on any trackpad. We really like how easy it is to get to Mission Control using multitouch gestures. It eliminates steps and gets you where you want to go, quickly.

Safari: Apple's Web browser got a few enhancements to make it easier to use and lets you use multitouch gestures to smoothly navigate from page to page. The app supports the newly designed scrolling method, along with tap or pinch to zoom, and swipes to navigate a tab's history. This is one area where you'll particularly notice the natural animations of the new multitouch gestures: when two-finger swiping a Web page, it slides over smoothly exactly at the speed you swipe. Even though the animations are mostly an aesthetic upgrade, we found it much easier and more elegant than hitting back on the Web browser and reloading past sites.

Mac OS X Lion

Acting as a set of temporary bookmarks, the Reading List will make managing your daily reading a snap. Just click the plus sign to the left of the address bar or Shift-click a link to add it to your Reading List. When you're finished with today's reading, you can save stories for later or clear it out.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

A new feature called Reading List acts as a temporary bookmarking system for stories you want to read a bit later. When you see a story you can't get to now, hit the plus sign to the left of the address bar and choose Reading List (you can also Shift-click a link in a story to automatically add it). Once you've collected a few stories, you can go back and read the preloaded sites in your Reading List. When you're done, you can click Clear All to clean out today's list. We think this particular addition is very useful for quickly grabbing links to stories without having to save them to your bookmarks.

A small but welcome addition is a new Download indicator on the upper right of the browser. When you download a file in Lion, an animation shows the file fly to the icon, then begins downloading. Click the icon to check progress or to look at past downloads. Though small, it's a much better interface design than digging through menus to show the Downloads window and lets you know right away that your download has been initiated.

Launchpad: Obviously taking queues from what works on iOS devices, Apple decided to add the same application layout to Mac OS X Lion. You still have an Application folder like previous versions of Mac OS X, but now you have the option to click the Launchpad icon in the Dock or use a three-finger and thumb-pinching motion to open Launchpad. Just like the iOS experience, you can click and hold an icon to bring up the jiggle motion, then reorder apps or drag them on top of each other to make folders. You can also easily delete an app by clicking the X next to the icon.

Mac OS X Lion

Launchpad brings the iOS app experience to Mac OS X Lion. We're not sold that it's the best way to navigate your apps, but the unifying design aesthetic will probably make it easier to switch for those whose only experience with Apple is through the iPhone.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

In our demo, Apple pointed out that the Dock has always had its limitations. It works great for keeping your favorite apps close by, but over time you'll end up with tons of small icons that are hard to see. While adjusting magnification helps somewhat, for a lot of apps, the Dock is not ideal. Now with Launchpad, you'll get the same experience as iOS devices, but we're still not convinced it will be well-received by users. We'll have to wait and see how users respond, but it seems like more of a gimmick (tying the functionality together with iOS devices) than an efficient way to open apps. We think it's almost like a step back from creating an application folder in the Dock, but you will have to decide for yourself which method you think is more efficient.

Autosave, versions, and resume: Everyone has had the experience of working on a document and hitting Command-Save frequently to make sure you don't lose anything. Likewise, we've all had the experience of losing our work after forgetting to save. Mac OS X Lion will now save your work every 5 minutes or whenever you do a significant action, like sending the document via e-mail, for example. It will also autosave when you pause for a significant amount of time, like when you're at the end of a paragraph. At each of these events the document is saved automatically so you no longer need to remember and will be less likely to lose your work.

Mac OS X Lion

With autosave and versions, you'll now be able to browse through old versions of a document the same way you browse Time Machine, Apple's backup system.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

What's even more impressive is that you now have the ability to look at past versions of your document just like you would look through Time Machine, the Mac's backup system. This means that if you don't like the direction you took on a document, or thought a past version was truly what you wanted, you'll now have the ability to pick a better version from the past. Autosave and versions is truly a welcome addition to OS X Lion that just about anyone will appreciate. Like other new technologies in OS X Lion, versions will only work on core apps like Preview, TextEdit, and the iWork suite initially, but it will be available as an API for third-party developers to add into their own apps, and we suspect most of them will.

Along with autosave and versions, you also never have to worry about closing down your Mac in a rush. With Mac OS X Lion's resume features, you'll always have the same apps open when you launch, just like you left them when you shut down. Even the applications themselves will be in the exact same state as you left them, ready for you to resume work. If you don't want to resume your desktop, system specs, and apps as you left them, or just want to start clean, you always have the option during restart to turn the feature off. We think that depending on the situation, the resume feature will definitely come in handy for getting back to work quickly, but it's also nice that you have the option to start fresh upon restart.

Mail: Apple's Mail app got a complete overhaul in Mac OS X Lion as well. It's clear that Apple listened to users, adding a laundry list of new features to add much-needed functionality and make one of the most important apps easier to use. A new wide-screen view--which many will recognize from the iPad mail app--lists messages (with a short preview) on the left and shows the full message and content on the right. When you compose a new message in full-screen mode, your inbox dims so you can focus on writing in the message window without distractions. A new Favorites bar sits just below the toolbar where you can get quick access to mail folders and see new message counts at a glance. Each of the new additions reduces the amount of digging through file menus and time spent clicking your mouse, so we think users will like most of the changes. For those who like browsing in folders, you're still able to view them by hitting the Show button on the left side of the toolbar.

A new formatting bar in messages makes it easy to make font changes and create formatted lists. Another new feature gives you one-click archiving to let you archive one or several messages, and the Mail app automatically creates an archive folder for you.

Mac OS X Lion

Apple's Mail App received a lot of attention in this update, adding excellent search tools, a layout like the iPad Mail app, and conversation views. We think this will be one of the favorite upgrades among Mac users.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

Searching in Mail got a major improvement that will be helpful to all users of the Mail app. As you type, Mail adds suggestions based on what's in your inbox. But you can then click a resulting suggestion that creates a Search Token that gives the term a rounded gray outline. When you enter another search term, it searches only the messages that include the term in the Search Token. These additions make it possible to search using a name, then a month, then a subject, and only get the results that include those criteria. Mail in Google already has a very powerful search engine, but with Apple's use of tokens, you have the ability to be much more specific.

AirDrop: Whatever computer you are using, sending a file quickly to a friend or coworker on the same network usually requires opening your e-mail client, composing an e-mail, attaching the file, and sending it off. Many companies have dropboxes to make this a bit easier, but it usually requires several steps. Mac OS X Lion makes this process painless with AirDrop. When you want to send a file, simply hit the AirDrop button in the left navigation field of a Finder menu, and you'll be given a graphical representation of users around you on local Wi-Fi. From there you can simply drag-and-drop the file on top of a coworker's avatar to send the file immediately. Anyone who uses a Mac in a work environment will appreciate this fairly simple, but important feature addition.

Mac OS X Lion

The new local sharing feature in Mac OS X Lion lets you view all nearby users so you can quickly drag and drop a file to send. With AirDrop you no longer have to navigate through menus or compose an e-mail when you just want to send a file.

(Credit: Screenshot by Jason Parker/CNET)

Switching from Windows: For those who work on Windows machines who are thinking about crossing over to Mac, Lion makes it easier to make the switch, with tools that import your most important data and personal files. Lion will automatically transfer your Outlook and Windows contacts, Outlook calendars, e-mail accounts (including Outlook and Windows Live mail), and all your music in iTunes. You can also import your home directory folder and contents, so you'll be able to find your most important files right away. It will even import your browser bookmarks from Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Safari and sync up your localization info and desktop picture.

It's no surprise that Apple would streamline this process to maximize new users, but we can appreciate the lengths it went to make the transition as smooth as possible.

Conclusions

Overall, Mac OS X Lion has more than 250 new features, many of them small, but all seemingly with the idea of making current common processes easier. The strong focus on multitouch gestures indicates Apple's focus on its more popular notebook line, but makes many helpful changes that desktop users will appreciate as well.

Mac OS X is not without its annoyances. We found some features to be a little gimmicky, like Launchpad for launching apps like an iOS device, but we also think carrying over the design aesthetic will probably help new users (whose only experience with Apple is through the iPhone) to acclimate to Mac OS X more quickly. We also believe it's a bad user experience to force people to buy Snow Leopard before being able to buy Lion--it almost seems like a punishment for not upgrading at every available opportunity. Although Apple has a pretty good reason (Snow Leopard introduced the Mac App Store), it seems there ought to be some way for users to upgrade without the additional cost. Still, to get all these features for $60 (if you don't have Snow Leopard) is not all that bad in our estimation--it just feels unfair.

Nevertheless, the features in Mac OS X Lion will make for an excellent upgrade for the price, whether for a Mac desktop or notebook. Upgrades that make the Mail app more useful; the addition of the very well-designed Mission Control; smart innovations like resume, autosave, versions; and AirDrop will all be welcome additions for any Mac user. For Snow Leopard owners, this upgrade is a no-brainer. For those who own an older system, it's probably still worth biting the bullet and adding several new features to the Mac operating system.

Mac OS X Lion (screenshots)

1-2 of 10
Scroll Left Scroll Right

Publisher's Description

More Products to Consider

  • Apple Mac OS X Snow...
    Snow Leopard operating system.

    This download is served from an external site

    close

    NOTICE: This link will open a connection to a third-party site. CNET cannot ensure the security of software that is hosted on external sites.

    Continue to download

    Sponsored Products

    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Apple Mac OS X Moun...
    OS X Mountain Lion is the latest release of the world's most ad...

    This download is served from an external site

    close

    NOTICE: This link will open a connection to a third-party site. CNET cannot ensure the security of software that is hosted on external sites.

    Continue to download

    Sponsored Products

    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • WhatsApp Pocket
    Extract, recover, and backup WhatsApp chat messages on your iPh...
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • RAR Expander
    Expand RAR archives on your Mac.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Apple Mac OS
    Updates 9.1-9.2 to 9.2.1 for G3s or higher.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Disk Inventory X
    Graphical disk usage utility.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Apple Boot Camp Sup...
    Run Windows on Intel Macs.

    This download is served from an external site

    close

    NOTICE: This link will open a connection to a third-party site. CNET cannot ensure the security of software that is hosted on external sites.

    Continue to download

    Sponsored Products

    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • NTFS-3G
    Mount, read & write to NTFS-formatted drives under OS X.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • TestDisk & PhotoRec
    Recover data and photos from lost partitions and drives.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • OnyX (Mavericks)
    Perform maintenance and other tasks on your Mac.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • XtraFinder
    Add tabs and new features to the OS X Finder.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • StuffIt Expander
    Expand over 30 formats: StuffIt, Zip, RAR, 7z, tar, open encryp...
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • SnapNDrag
    Screen capture utility.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Dropbox
    Synchronize your files automatically to your computers and the ...
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Softtote Mac File R...
    Recover files, photos and office documents.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • MiniTool Data Recov...
    Data recovery software.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Sync'Em
    Sync Exchange, Google and Apple contacts & calendars.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Softtote Mac Photo ...
    Recovers photo, videos and music files efficiently.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • WinZip Mac
    Experience the power of WinZip-on your Mac! Compressing, protec...
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • CleanMyMac 2
    Remove apps, data, and other unnecessary junk.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Softtote Mac Free D...
    Restore bmp, jpg, png, tif, mp3 files fast and accurately.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Softtote Mac Data R...
    Recover your lost data.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Visage Login
    Customize login window images, text message & host info.
    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
  • Apple iMac OS X 10....
    For mid 2010 iMacs.

    This download is served from an external site

    close

    NOTICE: This link will open a connection to a third-party site. CNET cannot ensure the security of software that is hosted on external sites.

    Continue to download

    Sponsored Products

    Download

    Installed

    Smart Install
All User Reviews

Results 1-10 of 89

  • 2.0 stars

    "Not ready for prime time"

    September 29, 2012  |   By hdrasin

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.5

    Pros

    I am Not sure

    Cons

    Makes Timemachine virtually useless
    Causes laptop to frequently spontaneously wake up from sleep, forcing me to shut off the computer in order to pause it.

    Summary

    Released too early. Shame on you Apple for behaving like Microsoft. I will now wait at least several months before updating my system based on what happened here-giving them time to work out the bugs.

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (0) (0)

  • 2.0 stars

    "S-l-o-w-l-y drove me crazy."

    September 24, 2012  |   By cultural_clutter

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.5

    Pros

    Some okay new features but not many. Launchpad and Mission Control are mildly useful. The nutty scroll direction I changed, using the option to return to that of the old Snow Leopard (and every other OS); whoever thought of that ought be fired ... several times. Also opted for the old Mail format. When I realized I was changing all the new features back to SL, it dawned on me that Lion was not my kind of kitty cat.

    Cons

    Oh boy, where to start. If this was a human, it would be a dandy candidate for rehab or an intervention. I'm a longtime MacHead with perfectly tuned, well-kept and uncluttered machines, but Lion had me wanting to throw my MBP out the window of a moving car. Super slow opening, closing and everything in-between. Lion also engendered a weird freeze creep. Was only a day or two from throwing in the towel and reinstalling Snow Leopard, when the HD came to a grinding halt only 3 weeks after the Lion install. I knew there was nothing wrong with the HD, so 1 full day, at least 8 passes of Disk Utility and 3 of Drive Genius cleared it up. But I still don't trust Lion. Installing Mt. Lion tomorrow. Still running Snow Leopard on my other MacBook and can't believe how much better, reliable and more enjoyable SL is than Lion. What a terrible thing Apple did to this Big Cat.

    Summary

    Never owned a PC running Windows/Vista, but believe I can now relate to war stories of those who've been through that OS hell.

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (0) (0)

  • 2.0 stars

    "Very Disappointing"

    August 17, 2012  |   By tim.stapleton@beyondbrowsing.c

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.2

    Pros

    Full disk Encryption

    Cons

    1) No spacess. Mission Control is very clumsy not useful for large numbers of desktops
    2) Scroll bars. Not there by default and they've got even smaller. Painfully small for hi-def monitors

    3) Resume. This feature sucks the big one. It continues to bring back windows you've finished with. You can't prevent it effectively with the checkbox options. When I close a window I mean it to stay closed. When I open a document I mean to use that document NOT other ones that were opened at some time in the past. This is a mess

    4) Desktop management is buggy. I have to force quit frequently for applications with windows on multiple desktops that pop an "Are you sure" dialog when quitting. The dialog does not show on any of the desktops. Sometimes you can flip between desktops and it will appear.

    5) Who's idea was it to move the mouse up to scroll the window down? Seriously?

    Summary

    A step in the wrong direction for professional users. I suspect Apple only cares about consumer market.


    I've got a MacBook Pro with 16 Gig of Ram and an OS that thinks it's running an iPhone.

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (0) (0)

  • 4.0 stars

    "One of the best Operating Systems out there!"

    July 27, 2012  |   By malnushi

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4

    Pros

    I love the multi touching gestures features, works great when going back to a page on safari or switching through desktop screens without opening the mission control application. There is a lot of multi touch gestures. Another great thing about this new OS is that it comes with a app called launch pad where when you open it, it opens a IOS type UI looking thing where it shows all your applications. It nice and very useful instead of putting a application folder on your dock, you can access a much funner looking application finder type of app. The new lock screen is what was great. A much better looking lock screen than the old one. It has the notification type of background what you see when you slide down the notification bard is IOS 5. Another great thing about Mac OS X Lion is that the price is amazing!!!! $30.00 right at the mac app store, even the thumb stick drive is $60.00. Unlike Windows computers where they release their products at $200 or more, even the older products.

    Cons

    The boot time could be a little faster, Snow leopard beat lion on the booting time so I was a little disappointed at that. It did not come with a weather app, but you can always get one at the mac app store for free or for $0.99 or more. No notification bar, but the new OS for $10 cheaper comes with it, so thats not bad, but it was a problem for some people. Launchpad has some lag to it when one page has a lot of applications in it, still no update for that even when Mac OS X Mountain Lion came out, I still have not tested Mountain Lion yet, but if I do I hope they fixed the lag. It shut down PPC applications, so you cannot use them! One ppc app is norton 11, but they came out with norton 12. Apps are trying leave PPC apps for Lion, but a lot are still ppc.

    Summary

    The OS is great, to me it beat Windows 7, Vista and all the older ones. I tried the consumer preview for Windows 8, it was fun, but OS X Lion topped it. I consider people to buy it when it was out!! But know that apple has cancelled it because Mountain Lion came out. I consider people to download that. Your in luck if you did not buy OS X Lion because the new one Mountain Lion is $20 (EXACT PRICE = $21).

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (0) (0)

  • 1.0 stars

    "A Royal Pain the in the Butt.."

    July 16, 2012  |   By techarchitect

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4

    Pros

    None...if it does not allow you to connect to network drives then its just a home entertainment PC.

    Cons

    No network drive connection.
    Slow
    Multi-tasking is ****

    Summary

    Windows on Mac with VMWare works better than OSX Lion...Shame Apple.

    Reply to this review Read reply (1)

    Was this review helpful? (0) (1)

  • 1.0 stars

    "Lion makes Windows/PC's look great!"

    May 29, 2012  |   By patti2012

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.3

    Pros

    I could get my email and cloud. Some nice face lifts on address book.

    Cons

    1. S-L-O-W beyond comprehension
    2. Causes all programs and software to lag or sometimes freeze.
    3. This is the worst operating system Apple has ever foisted on Apple users.
    4. Is this why Mountain Lion came out so fast to replace the "Vista"-like Lion???

    Summary

    Worst operating system- causes all software to lag or freeze. This reminds me of PC days. Absolutely not the quality that Apple is known for. Hope this is not a sign of Apple things to come:(

    Reply to this review Read reply (1)

    Was this review helpful? (0) (0)

  • 1.0 stars

    "APPLE losing touch..."

    May 7, 2012  |   By sgtmajor101

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.3

    Pros

    Let's see....well none. Again.

    Cons

    You are forced to spend $26 to buy it if you want to convert your apple email address to iCloud - if you don't your address is eliminated. Really Apple? - nice work.

    Then I had to upgrade my iPhoto ($10) and my iMovie ($10) in order for it have it available on my iPad and the macbook...

    Lets see - it took over an hour to load. Now that it has my batt life is far worse, the computer is running at a warmer temperature, and everything is slower...The Launch Pad is elementary (regressive really as it is so basic) and Mission Control as of yet has provided zero benifit.

    The control pad has been reversed (how you scroll) for no apparent reason...

    Apple did want me to sign up to feature to "find my Mac" whereby I can find my Mac in cyberspace and shut it down. Considering I've never had this problem, nor have I heard of it - I'm more than a little suspicious...Why does Apple want to know where my mac is...? Creepy and out of touch? More than a little.

    Summary

    The Mac runs slower and I'm suspicious as to why Apple wants to know where my Mac is. It's running at a warmer temperature and has added zero benefit for me. In addition I was forced to spend the $ to upgrade to it because otherwise my Apple email address (on Mobile Me) would be eliminated - I had to go to iCloud. iCloud itself is really very elementary and is nothing Blackberry has not been doing for a decade (syncronizing email, data, calenders etc) - even then I had to spend an extra $20 to get that to happen...

    All in all, it was yet another miss and another disappointment from a company which did not disappoint in the past.

    its too bad.

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (0) (0)

  • 1.0 stars

    "And yet Microsoft receives criticism..."

    April 28, 2012  |   By Windows7fan527

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.3

    Pros

    nothing at all

    Cons

    slow, unstable, doesnt support many older mac applications, interface is same nothing has changed, annoying mac dock still there, and a pain to upgrade.

    Summary

    Apple pays people to say good things about them. If they didnt they would receive more criticism then Microsoft. We should boycott apple and destroy there evil plans. They are what i like to call "the devils company" because they are down right greedy for peoples money. What ever you do do not buy this or apple products!!!

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (1) (2)

  • 2.0 stars

    "pain in the butt - no real improvement, don't do it~"

    April 25, 2012  |   By appleimacdude

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.3

    Pros

    Nanosaur may look just a bit even more impressive.

    Cons

    Back up is no longer supported with the expiration of mobile me. Had to write Apple a snail mail letter - no easy way to contact Apple via website - got stuck in an endless loop. Can't play most of my PPC games, which I miss - found out Fine Pix Viewer will not work anymore either. I - cloud has been i -crap, lost a lot of e-mail messages which went into never-never land, not in junk or trash folders either. Lets not forget that Firefox crashes often now also. PPC programs are not supported -

    Summary

    Not worth the money to upgrade 0/S two times - plus the expense to max out my RAM. The older operating system is better.

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (3) (1)

  • 2.0 stars

    "nothing but problems, reminds me of system 7.5"

    April 2, 2012  |   By innoutjoe1

    Version: Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7

    Pros

    Mission control is cool, and useful... oh, and the ability to encrypt external drives is useful.

    Cons

    Lots of new features that nobody asked for. Launchpad for example, completely useless. Full screen apps...not very practical. But those are small issues...

    1) Kernel panics - never had this problem before, but thanks to Lion I've had to deal with these.

    2) sometimes the track pad doesn't let you drag files, or click on anything - still haven't figured that out...

    3) Randomly one day I didn't have "permission" to save any of my documents. It said they were locked... every file, in my entire user folder. I took me several hours to get that fixed.

    Summary

    I use a Mac because I want to have a computer that "just works". If I wanted to have to troubleshoot something every day I would have gotten a PC. I don't enjoy troubleshooting, it really just pisses me off. I should have just stuck with Snow Leopard...

    Reply to this review

    Was this review helpful? (1) (1)

Results 1-10 of 89

Add Your Review

Log in or create an account to post a review.
You are logged in as . Please submit your review for Apple Mac OS X Lion 10.7.5 Supplemental Update
Add Your Review

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited.
Click here to review our site terms of use.

Submit your reply

Submit

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited.
Click here to review our site terms of use.

cancel

E-mail this review

Submit cancel

Report offensive content

If you believe this comment is offensive or violates the CNET's Site Terms of Use, you can report it below (this will not automatically remove the comment). Once reported, our staff will be notified and the comment will be reviewed.

Select type of offense:

Offensive: Sexually explicit or offensive language
Spam: Advertisements or commercial links
Disruptive posting: Flaming or offending other users
Illegal activities: Promote cracked software, or other illegal content
Submit cancel

Previous Versions:

Error

close

ERROR MESSAGE

If you think this is an error, please contact CNET TechTracker Support for further assistance.

Ok

Running Request

close

loading

Smart Install Software

close

CNET TechTracker will now automatically install software without requiring further action by you. (Note: This feature automatically accepts associated EULAs and third party applications on your behalf.)

You have selected the following software to Smart Install:

CNET TechTracker will attempt to install this software without interrupting you again. If an application requires manual installation, CNET TechTracker will download the installer and prompt you to take further action.

Proceed with Smart Install?

Confirm Standard Install Cancel

Submit a problem report for Apple Mac OS X Lion

close

Please describe the problem you have with this software. This information will be sent to our editors for review.

Problem:

The CNET Installer isn't working as expected

The download link does not work

The software has a newer version

The software contains malware

Other

Description:

Please select a feedback type.

Please enter a description.

Submit Problem Report

Problem Report submitted

close

Thank you for submitting a problem report! The Download team is committed to providing you with accurate software information.

OK

This download is served from an external site

close

NOTICE: This link will open a connection to a third-party site. CNET cannot ensure the security of software that is hosted on external sites.

Continue to download

Sponsored Products

Installed

Smart Install
Apple Mac OS X Lion for Mac