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Twitter (download for iOS or Android) is assembling a group of a few thousand users to beta test new conversation features. In a standalone tester app, users can experiment with organizational and context tools like status updates and ice breaker tweets.

Twitter is also testing color-coded replies, which are designed to make it easier to follow a conversation. Users could also soon see a more simplified user interface that hides engagement icons.

The social media site plans to start testing the program in the next few weeks, according to Engadget.

SEE: Twitter for iOS now finally lets you sort your feed in chronological order

Twitter announced the tests last year. Jack Dorsey, Twitter's CEO, told the House Committee on Energy that the company's main goal is to nurture open and civil conversations online.

Learning what people want and how they use Twitter is how the app stays valuable and relevant, Dorsey said at CES 2019.

Iconic staples in the social media site like the hashtag, the retweet and the @mention were all added based on understanding how people use the app, he said.

While it's important for any company to listen to consumer feedback, there's no need to reinvent the wheel. Adding a status update, which Twitter technically already has with the ability to send tweets, it begins to look more like Facebook.

Additionally, users respond differently to app updates. In the worst case scenario, they can damage the popularity of the app, like Snapchat.

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Takeaways

  1. Twitter is asking a few thousand users to try out new organization and context tools in a standalone tester app.
  2. Users can experiment with status updates, ice breaker tweets, color-coded replies and a simplified user interface.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.