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Spotify is raising its offline download limit. Previously, users could download only 3,333 songs over three devices. And the music streaming service will now let users download 10,000 offline across five devices.

Users can still only have 10,000 songs in their personal library, which is on one device. While it doesn't make sense that someone could keep more than a few hundred songs on a loop, users still want a library size increase.

The service offers more than 35,000 songs with no cap on listening -- sort of.

SEE: Spotify app tests weekly social playlists and a new look for Now Playing

"At Spotify, we're always working on improving the experience for our users," a Spotify spokesperson told the Rolling Stone.

Spotify's download cap is highly criticized on the service's forums for years. In 2016, Motherboard suggested Spotify use its latest fundraising to remove what they called "the service's most asinine limitation."

Motherboard said that while Spotify supports streaming over owning physical music, the service puts the same limitations of physical music by imposing a cap.

Once the user reaches the song limit, they have to start deleting music from their library. The 50,000 song upgrade might give users a little more wiggle room. Maybe the offline download increase hints that Spotify will soon increase or remove the limit its personal library.

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Takeaways

  1. Spotify announced users can now download 50,000 songs offline across five devices. Before they could only download about 10,000 across three devices.
  2. Spotify's song limits have been criticized for years and users hope the recent increase point towards more freedoms in the future.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.