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(Credit: CBS)

You can certainly grab a seat at a sports bar or a friend's house to watch the dynastic New England Patriots play the much-traveled Los Angeles Rams in Super Bowl 2019 in Atlanta.

But if you plan to be away from your TV on Sunday, February 3, you can still catch the action of this year's NFL championship game, where veteran Tom Brady leads his Patriots team against Jared Goff and the Rams.

CBS will broadcast Super Bowl LIII this year, and you can watch the game for free on your local CBS channel or streamed on CBS Sports HQ.

You can also watch the Super Bowl via an OTT service and its companion video streaming app, such as YouTube Live or, of course, CBS All Access. (But not Sling TV, which doesn't have rights to CBS.) Confirm that the CBS local affiliate is available in your region before you subscribe.

So grab an app for one of our recommended streaming services, head out the door, and livestream the NFL championship football game, without being tethered to your TV. Kickoff time is 6:30 p.m. ET, 3:30 p.m. PT.

CNET: Super Bowl 2019: How to watch Patriots vs. Rams online, start time and much more

CBS All Access

First off, you can watch Super Bowl 53 live on the CBS All Access app (download for Android and iOS). Subscriptions start at $5.99 per month and include live and on-demand shows, including "Star Trek: Discovery." And you can watch on your smart TV or mobile devices. (Note: Download.com is part of CBS.)

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(Credit: CBS All Access)

CBS Sports

CBS Sports is all over the Super Bowl. And you can watch the Patriots and Rams game for free on the CBS Sports app (download for Android and iOS).

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(Credit: CBS Sports)

DirectTV Now

For $40 a month, you can subscribe to the basic streaming service for DirectTV Now (download for Android and iOS), which includes CBS, if it's available in your area, plus 65 or so other channels.

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(Credit: DirectTV Now)

FuboTV

Get 85 or so channels -- many focused on live streaming sports -- plus your CBS affiliate, if it's available in your area, for $44.99 a month with FuboTV (download for Android and iOS) and watch the big game.

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(Credit: FuboTV)

CNET: Super Bowl 53: How to get your TV ready to watch

Hulu

It's hard to beat Hulu (download for Android and iOS) for original and live content. Hulu + Live TV offers live local channels -- including CBS -- plus entertainment and sports channels starting at $39.99 a month. Stream the championship game and get access to all of Hulu's on-demand catalog.

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(Credit: Hulu)

NFL Mobile

Watch the Super Bowl live on your phone or tablet for free with the NFL Mobile app (download for Android and iOS), no matter which wireless carrier you use. While waiting for the Super Bowl game to begin, kill time and watch highlights and a live feed of the NFL Network.

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(Credit: NFL)

Playstation Vue

Watch Patriots vs. Rams with the entry-level Access subscription of Playstation Vue (download for Android and iOS), which includes CBS and 50 or so other channels depending on your location, for $44.99 a month.

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(Credit: Playstation Vue)

Yahoo Sports

Yahoo's Sports app (download for Android and iOS) strives to be your one-stop source for sports news. Along with NFL coverage, it offers college and pro basketball, baseball, hockey and soccer. And like past years, you can watch a live stream of the Super Bowl on Yahoo's Sports app for free.

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(Credit: Yahoo)

YouTube TV

YouTube TV (download for Android and iOS) offers 60+ sports-heavy channels for $40 a month including CBS. Google's streaming service just expanded into 95 more markets, so check if the service is available in your area to watch the game.

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(Credit: YouTube TV)

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Clifford is an Associate Managing Editor for CNET's Download.com. He spent a handful of years at Peachpit Press, editing books on everything from the first iPhone to Python. He also worked at a handful of now-dead computer magazines, including MacWEEK and MacUser. Unrelated, he sits next to fellow editor Josh Rotter and roots for the A's.