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(Credit: Shelby Brown / Download.com)

The Shazam app (iOS, Android) became a fast favorite for music lovers on the go when it was released in 2008. By simply opening the app and tapping the "S," Shazam could tell you what song you were hearing and who was singing it.

In the spirit of economizing the number of apps on your smartphone, Snapchat (iOS, Android) and Shazam partnered in 2016.

Now, if you're about to take a Snap and hear a great song, you simply long-press the screen in Snapchat's camera mode. Little music notes will float around your finger as Shazam works to identify the song.

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Depending on the background noise, when Shazam recognizes the song, the result will display in the middle of your screen. You can either tap to get Song Info or dismiss it.

If you tap for Song Info, the app will prompt you to swap to your preferred music app where you can listen and read the lyrics. Shazam will also generate a list of songs you might also like.

Spotify (iOS, Android) users get an extra perk when they Shazam a song. The music app can create a playlist that houses only your Shazam'd tracks. As your list grows, Spotify will make suggestions for similar songs you might enjoy.

You can also send your Shazam'd track to any of your friends or groups on Snapchat.

The ability to Shazam a song on Spotify isn't new. The feature debuted shortly after the two companies partnered. According to the Daily Dot, the new addition went largely unnoticed. Though at the rate apps update and add new ways to compete with each other, it's easy to miss a change or two.

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Takeaways

  1. In Snapchat, users can long-press the screen in the app's camera mode. Little music notes will float around your finger as Shazam works to identify the song.
  2. After Shazam recognizes the song, the result will display in the middle of your screen. You can either tap to get Song Info, share the song, or dismiss the notification.

Also see

Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.