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Emergency situations require vital information fast. If a patient is too young or traumatized to provide it, an app could save time and lives.

The Medical ID app (download for Android) provides doctors and EMTs with important personal information like health conditions, medication, allergies or religious requests.

After you create a profile, you can add a widget to your smartphone's lock screen. During an emergency, a paramedic can tap the widget and be taken directly to your Medical ID profile.

SEE: 'Nurse 1-1' health app provides basic medical information from physician assistants and nurses

In Arkansas, EMS provider Josh Kuykendall said the app has already proven useful.

"Without the knowledge of those medications, we have to do more investigation and take more time to figure out how to take care of you," Kuykendall told KNWA news.

A user's profile also includes their age, height, weight, blood type, organ donor status and emergency contact.

The Medical ID app is free to download, unlike medical ID bracelets and necklaces, which can be costly. The app offers a paid Premium version as well.

"The main purpose of the app is to help people and ultimately save lives," the app website said.

The free version includes access to your medical information from the lock screen widget, nearby hospital localization and supports one profile.

Medical ID Premium supports unlimited profiles, customizable widgets, multiple emergency contacts, data back up and frequent updates.

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Takeaways

  1. The Medical ID app provides doctors and EMTs with important personal information like health conditions, medication, allergies or religious requests.
  2. A user's app profile also includes their age, height, weight, blood type, organ donor status and emergency contact.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.