lifteime.jpg
(Credit: Screenshot by Download.com)

Trying to control your music or podcast while you're cooking, exercising or driving can be frustrating and dangerous. Smart devices for your car and home are safer and easier ways to achieve hands-free control over what you're listening to, but not everyone can afford them.

Whether you don't want to stop your jumping jacks to swap playlists or you want a more minimalist music display, Listen: The Gesture Music Player app could what you need.

Listen runs on iPhone and iPad. The app works with Apple Music, and you can use it without looking because it responds to gestures, not button presses. Users can also stream music via AirPlay.

SEE: Best Apple Music alternatives for streaming songs and playlists in 2019

The interface is simple to use. Swipe left and right to change tracks. Tap to play or pause a track. Swipe up to add a song to a Favorites Playlist. And your gestures don't need to be precise either.

If your phone auto locks, you can disable the setting in auto lock for further convenience while you're streaming.

Listen as a music player is free. A $3 subscription to Listen includes radio stations that lets you tailor the music to your tastes, whether local or international.

Of course, if you're listening to music on your smartphone while driving, the safest way to do so is hands-free with Bluetooth and steering-wheel controls. A mount kit that attaches your smartphone is also a safer alternative if you need your phone while driving.

While Listen isn't perfect, it does provide a safer, easier way to navigate music while performing other tasks. If iOS users are looking for a change of pace from familiar music players or online radio, Listen offers a fresh take.

In addition, if a person has visual impairments, not having to locate small buttons could make music players more accessible.

FOLLOW Download.com on Twitter for all the latest app news.

Takeaways

  1. Listen: The Gesture Music Player app works with Apple music and you can use it without looking because it responds to gestures, not button presses.
  2. The interface is simple to use. Swipe left and right to change tracks. Tap to play or pause a track. Swipe up to add a song to a Favorites Playlist. The gestures don't need to be precise either.

Read more

Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.