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(Credit: Screenshot by Download.com)

Losing your cell phone today is a way bigger deal than it was 10 years ago. Today people use their phones for banking or have their credit cards tied to apps.

Google's Find My Device app helps you find your lost Android device and lock it until you recover it. You can leave a custom message or a contact number on the screen for anyone who might find it.

The app added a new feature that maps a building you might've lost your phone in, letting you zoom in on your device for a more precise location.

SEE: Best apps for securing Android and managing privacy settings

The tool would be useful if your phone is lost in a large mall, airport, or similar setting.

According to The Verge, Google spent years recording the layouts of department stores, malls, and airports to build the "Indoor Maps" feature. It's unclear yet which buildings the new feature applies to yet.

Even without the new feature, the Find My Device app is still helpful. While it may be less specific than the new "Indoor Maps," users can zoom in to get a general shape of the building.

The app is packed with tools to help you find your device from your phone, tablet, or smartwatch. If the device's location can't be determined, Google finds the last known one.

When you get closer to the location the app gives, you can choose to play a sound at full volume, even if your phone is on silent.

If worse comes to worst and you don't find your device, you can erase the contents.

The app is useful every day but especially during the holiday season, when everyone is wading through packed shopping malls and flying across the country.

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Takeaways

  1. Google's Find My Device app added a new feature that maps a building you might've lost your phone in, letting you zoom in on your device for a more precise location.
  2. The tool would be useful during the holidays when everyone is wading through packed shopping malls and flying across the country.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.