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(Credit: Andrey Popov/iStockphoto)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) now has a massive impact on the decisions we make every day -- including for our apps and devices.

AI gives us recommendations on almost everything: movies, books, restaurants, music, travel -- even friends and dates. But how happy are we with the results, and how much do we trust what AI recommends for us?

Innovative Technology Solutions (ITS) surveyed 2,000 Americans to better analyze consumers' relationship to AI.

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Satisfaction of AI recommendations

ITS asked survey participants how happy they were with the recommendations made by AI. Consumers were most satisfied with recommendations from GPS apps like Google Maps (download for iOS or Android).

Google Maps' Explore and For You tabs have expanded how users can find places to eat and activities. The app's location sharing feature gives peace of mind to users when they or a loved one is on the road.

Consumers were least satisfied with news apps, though the dissatisfaction might go beyond AI and concern the credibility of sources.

Friends over AI

Even with all the technology available, ITS found that consumers (for the most part) still rely on recommendations from friends.

Consumers trusted a friend's recommendation over AI when it came to dating apps. It's possible that being matched by a program might take some of the magic out of meeting someone new. Friends who truly know you might have a better idea of who you'd like instead of an algorithm.

Music recommendations were divided, as consumers trusted both AI and friends almost equally. Streaming platforms like Spotify (download for iOS or Android) do pretty well in assembling playlists based on your listening history, in my experience.

Does AI broaden your horizons?

One of the best parts of AI recommendations can be trying something new. ITS' survey reported that consumers accepted music, TV and movie suggestions the most. In addition to building personalized playlists, Spotify suggests other artists based on your listening history.

Netflix (download for iOS or Android) offers a similar feature by listing titles in the "Because you watched..." or "Because you liked..." sections.

Half of the participants said that news apps broaden their horizons "a little." But users have to be careful, because often -- unless you're actively searching unbiased sources and alternative points of view -- AI can naturally favor and reinforce your particular beliefs.

The Future of AI

We tread a thin line between what constitutes an invasion of privacy and what's simply AI using the parts of our life history to make recommendations. So what areas of life are people comfortable with AI involvement?

Those surveyed said they would be comfortable with AI advising them on finances or investing money, doing their taxes, TSA screening in airports, diagnosing or treating medical issues and weighing in on hiring decisions.

Responses indicated that consumers felt less comfortable with AI determining college acceptance, determining salaries, making strategic military decisions, settling legal disputes, operating a self-driving car or electing politicians.

As AI continues to expand into our lives, it's important that we continue to evaluate if we are getting what we want from AI and our levels of trust in specific areas.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.