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(Credit: Screenshot by Download.com)

The dating app Coffee Meets Bagel (iOS, Android) is losing some of its bells and whistles in favor of a more straight-forward look. The app's new display is mostly white with larger profile pictures.

"Some of our color choices and [user experiences] really felt like they were getting in the way of [users] being able to focus on other users," app co-founder Dawoon Kang told CNET.

Along with a minimalist aesthetic, the app lets users comment on specific parts of a profile, like a photo or bio, instead of just liking it.

SEE: Best alternatives to Tinder to find love and romance

Coffee Meets Bagel also removed the ability to give users a "bagel." The action was the app's way of letting another user set you up with someone. Users who gave others "bagels," got extra possible matches for themselves.

Coffee Meets Bagel offers users one suggested possible profile, or a bagel, to match with per day. Tapping Discover shows other profiles that are outside of your preferences. The app's currency -- coffee beans -- let users access more features.

With enough beans, you can view a suggested match's activity report. The activity report can tell you how often the person sends the first message, when they're active, how fast they'll write back, and how much they chat with other matches.

And if you're ready to chat with someone but are nervous, Coffee Meets Bagel offers conversation starters.

The company decided to give its app a makeover following a consumer survey results from earlier this year.

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Takeaways

  1. The Coffee Meets Bagel app's has been redesigned with new, mostly white display with larger profile pictures.
  2. Users can almost comment on specific parts of another user's profile like photos and bios.

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Shelby is an Associate Writer for CNET's Download.com. She served as Editor in Chief for the Louisville Cardinal newspaper at the University of Louisville. She interned as Creative Non-Fiction Editor for Miracle Monocle literary magazine. Her work appears in Glass Mountain Magazine, Bookends Review, Soundings East, and on Louisville.com. Her cat, Puck, is the best cat ever.