Display detailed data about your system's memory with RAMMon | Download Product Review - CNET Download.com

Display detailed data about your system's memory with RAMMon

Monitor your RAM's SPD data with this simple but essential freeware.

Your computer uses a standard known as Serial Presence Detect (SPD) to access information about its memory modules. PassMark's RAMMon is a free tool that can extract and display that information in a table view that you can save, print, and export. It can automatically search Amazon.com for your RAM manufacturer's name, if you need to find new modules. RAMMon displays critical data that overclockers depend on when they push their RAM to the limits of its capabilities.

RAMMon is available in separate releases for 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows, so be sure you download the right one. The installer offers standard options like creating a desktop icon. The program's user interface is plain but clearly configured. The main window's displayed our system's SPD data in a list view with alternating highlighted rows. The program has columns for Slot 1, Slot 2, Slot 3, and Slot 4. Our system's two memory slots were displayed under Slot 1 and Slot 3, with Slots 2 and 4 listed as not populated. RAMMon displays a lot of information: each module's Memory Capacity, Voltage, Bus Clock Speed, Banks, Ranks, Timings @ Max Frequency, CAS Latencies, and much more. Not every module will supply the same information; for instance, there's a field for Module Revision, which won't apply to some releases (like ours).

RAMMon has a series of five buttons, but only one of them does anything related to the program's main mission; the Export/Copy button. Pressing this produces a small dialog that let us choose HTML or Text format and whether to copy to the clipboard or write to a file. The Help button opens a very good HTML-based Help file, and the PassMark Home button opens the developer's Web site. The other two buttons are About and Exit. We also clicked the embedded hyperlink in the list to search Amazon.com, but it merely opened our browser and searched the site for our RAM manufacturer's name. And that's about all there is to RAMMon, though that's enough; its job is to extract and display your RAM's SPD data, and it does that splendidly.

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