All your software

Centralize and back up your critical software records with this free app.

If you've ever lost a program's product key code or other essential documentation, you can probably appreciate a tool that helps you keep track of all your software. How about All My Software? It's a free application from Bolide that scans your Windows system for all installed software, including support and contact information, links, and even order date and number, if applicable, and saves them in a database you can export to Excel.

All My Software's installation wizard includes a scanning stage that displays files in the registry with the option to exclude them from the database, delete them, or scan them. We chose the default setup, and the All My Software interface opened when the setup wizard closed. This interface is a compact, businesslike dialog that can be dragged around the desktop but not resized. The program's preferences are limited to language, autosave, and database backup reminders. The icon-based toolbar includes some useful extras, such as an Excel export button and one to attempt to uninstall the selected software. The left-hand navigation panel toggles between a software list and a developer-based tree view, while the main view has the familiar look of a virtual form, with entry fields for software title, developer, links, price, and more; many already filled in. There's a field to enter or paste in the registration key for the selected program, which we recommend doing every time you install software, and a Notes section, too. You can also attach files to records, a useful feature. All My Software recommends backing up your personal database to an external drive or device, an online storage site, or network share--anywhere but the software's main folder. We agree, and we saved our records to a thumb drive.

All My Software is freeware that requires free registration, a fairly painless process. Some Vista and Windows 7 users may have trouble with the .chm-format Help file due to a known issue. Obviously a Help file that won't open is a major issue, but we had no trouble using All My Software. It makes it easy for you to centralize your critical software records, back them up, and keep them safe until you need them, which you always do.

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