Babylonian Twins

Babylonian Twins is a tough, old-school puzzle-platformer with great graphics and unusual, unforgiving gameplay.

Babylonian Twins is a tough, old-school puzzle-platformer with great graphics and unusual, unforgiving gameplay.

The game is an enhanced revision of a Commodore Amiga game developed in Iraq in the early '90s that was never published due to economic sanctions and the collapse of Commodore. Given its history, Babylonian Twins feels like a time capsule from that era of gaming, in ways both good and bad: Nostalgic gamers will love the long and intricately designed levels, but tricky twitch controls (made trickier by the touch interface) and a lack of modern checkpoints to save your progress can make the game brutally difficult at times, with levels that can already take copious trial-and-error to complete.

Your interface is a virtual joystick and two touch-screen buttons, along with a tab that you tap to activate the game's central shtick: switching back and forth between controlling the twins Blasir and Nasir. Blasir wields a mace (to break open vases and stun opponents) and can spin around to drill down through weak spots in the floor. Nasir wields a sword (effective against opponents but not vases) and he can jump higher and sprint to break through weak spots in walls. Whenever you take control of one twin, the other becomes a statue (which can then be used as a jumping platform), and much of the game involves toggling back and forth between the two, avoiding enemies and navigating through circuitous puzzles to collect points, keys, and the hidden "golden palms" required to exit each level.

Babylonian Twins is a lot of game. Casual gamers might get frustrated with its difficulty, but Babylonian Twins should give hard-core gamers hours of old-school fun.

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