Mediocre Bible study

Be prepared to wait if you want to access most of this program's content.

Bible Study Pro bills itself as a comprehensive Bible resource, with multiple versions, commentary, and plenty of other features to help with Bible study. Unfortunately, we found that much of the program's content must be ordered on CDs; the content that actually comes with the download is negligible.

The program's interface is fairly sleek and is reminiscent of Microsoft Office 2007 products. Navigation is arranged in panes, with a tree hierarchy displaying each book and chapter of the King James Version (the only one included with the program). Another pane displays the content of the selected book, and to the right of that, users can view commentary from John Darby or Matthew Henry. There are also links for Nave, Torrey, and Easton's Bible Dictionary, but clicking on these links didn't seem to do anything. The program does have a search feature that works well, but we didn't find much else that impressed us. The vast majority of the program's features--multiple versions, Gospel stories, daily devotionals, and an interfaith explorer--required us to request a CD with the relevant content. The online tutorials were brief and really only gave us a simple overview of how the program worked. Overall, we were not impressed. The program looks nice, but fails to deliver when it comes to content.

Bible Study Pro is free. It installs desktop icons without asking but uninstalls without issues. We do not particularly recommend this program; there are better Bible study tools available.

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