Beyond RSS basics

While you can definitely get by on free RSS readers that offer all the basic services, newshounds looking for more flexibility will find it here.

This RSS reader may not have it all, but it gets pretty close. Newsstand lets you add new feeds at any time, but to make life easier, it also bidirectionally syncs with Google Reader, so you can almost immediately populate Newsstand with Google feeds. You can also import feeds by entering a URL, browsing the feed directory, or importing an OLMP file of feed from a different RSS reader. Thanks to some Twitter and Delicious integration, you can also subscribe to your Twitter timeline or other terms, and to your Delicious bookmarks, network, or in-box.

Feeds show in a linear, well-ordered list, but the tap of a button switches to the artistic rendition that imagines each feed as a newspaper on a rack, and its latest story as the top headline. Two such newspaper show on a screen, with the number of unread stories clearly marked. Swipe to the left or right to view more.

Either way you get to a single feed's list of headlines, you'll have some options when you're there. You can download images to view offline, copy the Web site URL, or mark a feed read. After tapping a headline, you can star it to mark as a favorite, and you can view it on its original Web page via Newsstand's in-app browser. There's also a sharing feature that can (again) automatically copy the URL, prepare the link in an e-mail, or post to Twitter, Delicious, or Instapaper services.

While you can definitely get by on free RSS readers that offer all the basic services, newshounds looking for more flexibility will find it here.

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