Works, but nothing special here

Falls squarely in the middle of the pack as far as password keepers go, but easy to learn pull-down menus, and simple program operation make the app one for less experienced users.

It falls squarely in the middle of the pack as far as password keepers go, but easy to learn pull-down menus, and simple program operation make the application one for less experienced users. Nothing truly special here, but no out and out flaws either.

Right off the bat, Scarabay proves to go only half way. The app allows users to drag and drop Web site, login, and password data onto your favorite browser. Unfortunately, users must perform the work with three steps. A front runner would open the page and fill in the data with one double-click. The application also fails to automatically save data as it is entered, an easy-to-use feature found in top-notch password savers.

Scarabay does offer more flexibility than most with the option to open saved Web sites in any of nine popular browsers. It's easy to create folders of sites and sort with just a click. Extras such as USB install, multiple password protected accounts, skinning, a password generator and auto-saving of the Web site database help the application finish strong, if not among the best in the field.

Scarabay is freeware and simple to use. It's not the best we've tried, but it gets the job done and deserves a test run for any user looking for a cheap and easy way to manage passwords.

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