View and manipulate your browser cache

Forget about exploring your Firefox or Google Chrome cache. When it comes to browser cache, the biggest problem that most users face is figuring out in just which folder the elusive cache resides.

Forget about exploring your Firefox or Google Chrome cache. When it comes to browser cache, the biggest problem that most users face is figuring out in just which folder the elusive but often-important browsing history data resides. MozillaCacheView and ChromeCacheView from long-time freeware utility publisher NirSoft make it easy to not merely view your cache, but to truly get your hands deep into it, too.

ChromeCacheView on the left, and MozillaCacheView on the right.

(Credit: Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

The interface of either will instantly bore you. How uninspired is it? It's so dull I've got to point out that there's a menu bar, because right below it there's a row of nearly indecipherable buttons. Most of what you'll want is there, and thankfully they all have mouse-over tooltips so you can figure what they do on the fly. A little bit of exploring will help you grok what each one does. In order: you can select the cache folder, open the cached item's link in your browser, copy selected cached files to a new folder, or delete selected files. The next two buttons let you filter the cache and clear the filter, and we were surprised at how well the filter worked.

You can also save items, refresh the list so you don't need to restart the program, copy items to the clipboard, view properties, and perform a search. The search option allows for a more refined process than the filter. Under the View option you can export an HTML report of your cache's contents. MozillaCacheView also gives you hot keys for all its major functions, and includes several preset filters under the Options menu. Annoyingly, the programs come as ZIP archives and not as executables.

They are slightly different: ChromeCacheView doesn't provide as many options, most notably lacking the ability to delete cache items and lacking the filter. The programs are surprisingly powerful despite the lackluster interface, and make for an excellent lightweight way to explore your cache folders.

CNET Top 5
Companies Apple could buy with their billions
Apple's sitting on a massive pile of cash. Here are five interesting ways they could spend it.
Play Video
 

Member Comments