Proprietary scrobbling comes to Winamp

The latest version of Winamp introduces the proprietary song-scrobbler Orgler.

There's a temptation to mock people who still talk about Winamp, and its true that AOL gave up its industry-leading position to Apple without a fight. However, the past few years have seen Winamp reinvent itself as a jukebox for those who haven't been bitten by the iTunes bug, and the latest version introduces the proprietary song-scrobbler Orgler.

Orgler scrobbles music to give AOL Music some Web 2.0 flair, finally.

(Credit: Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Much like Last.fm's scrobbling, Orgler sends your music data up to the cloud. Also like Last.fm, it allows members of the AOL/Winamp community to contribute their played songs to a list of what's been on their stereos. Tracks get added to your AOL Music page, and since the service is a Winamp-designed plug-in, it integrates seamlessly and users should find none of the sluggish behavior that occasionally afflicts third-party Last.fm plug-ins. Orgler was originally available in beta as an external Winamp plug-in.

To set up the service, go to Online Services under the Media Library tab. Go to the second page of the site that opens in the built-in browser, and activate Winamp Charts. Log in with your Winamp or AOL log-in--your AOL IM log-in will work, too--and you'll be all set to Orgle.

Seeing as how there's been Last.fm support for Winamp for ages Orgler is more about not sending listeners elsewhere for their music community needs than dragging Winamp users into the present. Still, Orgler's not a bad service.

Last.fm is a part of CBS Interactive, which also publishes Download.com.

CNET Top 5
Companies Apple could buy with their billions
Apple's sitting on a massive pile of cash. Here are five interesting ways they could spend it.
Play Video
 

Member Comments