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EverClip review

Designed for the popular note-taking app Evernote, EverClip (Web Clipper) proves a handy app to have, but could do with some interface and accessibility improvements. Still, it remains one of the better Web clippers for Android.

Pros

Works: You can clip content either by saving text or graphics to the clipboard, or more conveniently, by sharing URLs to EverClip and then using the app's clumsy yet functional clipping frame to select what you want to save. While the process isn't as straightforward as it could have been if this app was a browser extension, it does work.

Clipboard … Read more

WEB to PDF review

As a handy add-on for the powerful UC Browser, WEB to PDF does a good job of converting most pages and saving them to your device. However, it runs into problems when dealing with more sophisticated layouts and doesn't let you exclude ads or images.

Pros

Easy to use and practical: WEB to PDF can be accessed through the add-ons icon at the end of your URL field and converts pages with just three taps, handling average pages with more text than images in less than a minute.

Fairly accurate: It performs an accurate conversion of most pages, conserving … Read more

Google speeds WebP image format, brings animation support to Chrome

Google has built a new version of its WebP software into Chrome to let browsers display its image format 25 percent faster, the company said Friday.

The better performance new libwebp 0.4.0 is part of Google's general effort to speed up the Web, and the new software also uses less memory and fixes an issue that had blocked Google from supporting animated WebP images. The updated WebP support is built into the version of Chrome that's currently in beta.

Animated GIF images, popular on sites such as Tumblr and Imgur, are the last remaining holdout for … Read more

Use Link Bubble to open links in the background on Android

While many apps are starting to display in-line media (showing content of a link without opening a new window), this capability isn't omnipresent across Android. Instead, when catching up on one of your feeds, like Twitter, you have to click the link, and then wait for it to load in Chrome. Link Bubble is an app that seeks to bridge the gap between your apps and the Web by letting you queue up a link to read when you're finished catching up on social media or RSS feeds. It's similar to when you open tabs in the … Read more

Khronos finishes WebCL 1.0 to let Web apps tap into GPU

WebGL has been a strong success, bringing hardware-accelerated 3D graphics to the browser. Now the standards group behind it hopes to let Web apps get even more use out of the graphics chip by releasing version 1.0 of an interface called WebCL.

At this week's Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, the Khronos Group standards body announced the ratification and release of WebCL 1.0. WebCL lets programmers run general-purpose tasks on a device's graphics processing unit (GPU) or on a multicore central processing unit (CPU), the main brain in computers and mobile devices.

Just as WebGL … Read more

Firefox 28 aims for easier media playback

Firefox 28 debuts with an emphasis on under-the-hood improvements to keep the browser in line with the latest plug-in-free media playback tools.

VP9 decoding and Opus support in WebM keeps Firefox current with the royalty-free codecs that power media playback in HTML5.

They're not exactly another nail in the coffin for Flash, since Firefox already offers broad HTML5 media playback support, but they do signal that plug-in-free codecs are maturing into broad usability.

Firefox 28 for desktops also gets a new volume control for HTML5 audio and video, and Mac OS X users get Notification Center support for Web … Read more

Friday Poll: What will the Web be like in 25 more years?

The Web turned 25 this week and the birthday celebrations have been full of memories and musings. Crave's Eric Mack put together a four-part series tracing his life through the Web, from his days as a teenage dial-up addict, through the dot-com boom and bust, to how the Web looks today.

It's been a wild ride so far, but where will the roller coaster take us next? There's been plenty of speculation on the future of the Web. Even though "Minority Report" came out back in 2002, it's still mentioned constantly as a model for immersive interactions with computers. Perhaps we'll all be flailing our hands about in the air as we interface with a Web that has pretty much the whole world under surveillance.… Read more

Add speed reading to Chrome, Firefox

Speed reading is about to have another popularity spike -- one likely fueled by the recent announced of Spritz on the Galaxy S5. The speed reading feature will come included with some apps, and uses a single focal point in words, along with rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP for short) to display words one-by-one at speeds up to 1000 words per minute.

This technology is not only useful on smartphones or tablets, it's also great for tackling longer written works online in less time. If you search for what the average reading speed is, you'll come up with … Read more

The Web at 25: How it won the White House -- and won me back

This week I've been celebrating 25 years of the Web by retracing my own life, lived largely online, from the Web's early years to the dot-com boom and bust to the slow emergence of Web 2.0, which I largely missed while in self-imposed digital exile in Alaska. In the final installment today I look at how I came back to the Web just in time for things to get really good.

Look through my author's profile here at CNET and you might notice that I'm a bit obsessed with following the latest developments in the mobile world, from even the most hopeful iPhone rumors to torture-testing ruggedized Android phones. But back in January of 2007 when the first iPhone was introduced, arguably kicking off the global smartphone craze and eventually helping to push the mobile Web into the mainstream, I missed it completely.

I was focused on being a new father at the time, and although I was back living in the contiguous United States after a stint in a fly-in village in the Alaskan bush where even landline calls came with a 3-second satellite delay, I still had not yet fully re-immersed myself in digital life. … Read more

The Web at 25: Out of the ashes and onto the Friendster

In part 1 of "The Web at 25," I recalled the early days of the Web and how it exposed young, emerging nerds like myself to whole new worlds online. In part 2, the story continued as I came of age alongside the Web during the era of the dot-com boom and bust. Today, on the actual 25th birthday of Tim Berners-Lee submitting the concept that became the World Wide Web, I'll revisit the long, painful hangover (it was a literal hangover, in my case) that followed until the eventual emergence of Web 2.0 that laid … Read more