https

HTTPS Everywhere for Firefox review

HTTPS Everywhere enhances your Web-browsing security by forcing your Firefox browser to operate in the HTTPS secure encrypted mode. It works invisibly for HTTPS-enabled sites, cooperates with Tor, and allows you to write your own rulesets in XML to better automate the switching of specific sites to their secure version.

Pros

Invisible: We installed HTTPS Everywhere almost instantly and were able to enjoy increased HTTPS security for popular sites like Facebook, Twitter, and 500px. We got into the good habit of checking for HTTPS in the address window even when we were not entering sensitive data for online sales.

Rulesets: … Read more

HTTPS Everywhere for Chrome review

A plug-in alpha port based on a Firefox plugin, HTTPS Everywhere for Chrome works silently in the background, forcing HTTPS compliant Web sites to exclusively operate in this secure mode instead of inadvertently switching to HTTP operation. It's a handy piece of software to have, but it's not yet as good as its Firefox counterpart.

Pros

Automatic operation: HTTPS Everywhere for Chrome requires hardly any actions on your part except for selecting the sites to be included in HTTPS Everywhere activity, although this is not something you have to do often. For sites where content cannot be loaded … Read more

6 security tips for using public Wi-Fi

Don't expose yourself in public. We all do it: switch on a phone, laptop, or tablet and hop on to a Wi-Fi hotspot in airports, coffee shops, trains, hotels, and other public places. The problem is, those networks are open -- even if they require a login and password, you may be sharing your files or leaving doors open to data thieves. You can't secure the network, but you can raise siege walls between your private information and the barbarians. Follow these six tips to network more safely.

1. Lock down your security settings.

Go to the security … Read more

Forget Flappy Bird. We're all hooked on 2048

CNET Update is much loving Doge2048:

In this episode of Update:

- Learn why 2048 is the new Flappy Bird, and say goodbye to productivity when you discover the parody game Doge2048. But if you want a game with more substance, check out "Papers, please," which won top honors at the Independent Games Festival.

- Know your Gmail is always encrypted, now that Google requires HTTPS.

- Gawk at the price of Samsung's 110-inch 4K television.

- Head to CNET on Tuesday to follow the live unveiling of the new HTC One smartphone.

CNET Update delivers the … Read more

Review: StartPage HTTPS Search for Safari for Mac lets you search anonymously

StartPage HTTPS Search for Safari for Mac provides an elegant solution for anonymous Web browsing in the form of a small but powerful Safari extension. The service is based on Google, which means that users can enjoy the benefits of the world's top search engine without any of the major security concerns. If browser security is important to you, you'll like this extension.

After installing StartPage HTTPS Search for Safari, you'll notice a new button on the toolbar to the left of the address field. Clicking on it pops up a text field that links to StartPage'… Read more

Chrome's parental controls step closer to adulthood

Google Chrome's rumored parental control feature moved into Chrome beta on Tuesday, and it stands to make Chrome and Chrome OS even more appealing to parents and teachers.

Chromebooks have done well in the United States, capturing around a quarter of the sub-$300 PC market in the past year. The low-price laptops also have gained attention from educators, in part because of their price, but also because they include keyboards, essential for teaching children typing skills.

Supervised Users would give Chrome OS a long-missing feature: multiple accounts that can be differentiated by privilege status. For now, a supervised … Read more

Security certificate problem trips up Bing Web site

A security certificate problem triggered warnings not to use Bing over a secure Web connection Friday, and Microsoft said an issue with network service provider Akamai is to blame.

Browsers displayed prominent error messages and warnings at about 9 a.m. PT when visiting https://bing.com.

The HTTPS standard governs how Web browsers and Web servers set up encrypted communications, for example so that others can't eavesdrop on network activity to find out what you're searching for, but valid and up-to-date security certificates are required for such communications.

"An attacker on your network could be trying … Read more

Apple finally fixes App Store flaw by turning on encryption

Apple has finally fixed a security flaw in its application store that for years has allowed attackers to steal passwords and install unwanted or extremely expensive applications.

The flaw arose because Apple neglected to use encryption when an iPhone or other mobile device tries to connect to the App Store, meaning an attacker can hijack the connection. In addition to a security flaw, the unencrypted connections also created a privacy vulnerability because the complete list of applications installed on the device are disclosed over Wi-Fi.

It also allows the installation of apps, including extremely expensive ones that top out at … Read more

Troubleshooting HTTPS timeouts in OS X Mountain Lion

After upgrading to Mountain Lion, some OS X users have run into what appears at first glance to be a DNS-related problem in which they can't access certain Web pages. While most Web connectivity seems to work just fine, when accessing special pages like HTTPS (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure) connections the connection times out, resulting in programs like Safari claiming the server could not be contacted.

If you are having this problem, then try copying the server URL from your browser or other application and pinging it directly in the OS X Terminal using the following command:

ping www.… Read more

Apple's switch to HTTPS thwarts Chinese censors

Apple's use of HTTPS for its App Store isn't winning it any friends from the Chinese government.

The company seems to have recently turned on the more secure protocol for its App Store. Before that switch, censors in China could block Chinese users from searching for certain types of apps, such as VPN software, according to Greatfire.org, which monitors Chinese Internet censorship.

Searching for such apps would cause the actual connection to reset, meaning users in China couldn't download them even if they were available in the Chinese App Store.

But now with the more secure … Read more