accessibility posts on CNET

accessibility

Netflix's Hastings makes the case for Net neutrality

Though Netflix agreed last month to pay Comcast for direct access to its broadband network, it doesn't appear to like the arrangement.

The video-streaming service's CEO, Reed Hastings, penned a blog post on Thursday making an impassioned plea for support of Net neutrality.

"The Internet is improving lives everywhere -- democratizing access to ideas, services, and goods," Hastings wrote. "To ensure the Internet remains humanity's most important platform for progress, Net neutrality must be defended and strengthened. The essence of Net neutrality is that ISPs such as AT&T and Comcast don't … Read more

Make use of the iCloud keychain

Apple's keychain feature in OS X saves your passwords, keys, and certificates for seamless authentication to various system and Web services. In addition to storing keys, one of the features of the keychain is secure notes, where you can save important information like registration codes and product serial numbers, or authentication information for services that do not interface with the keychain. These notes will be securely encrypted along with your standard passwords, certificates, Safari credit card entries, and other information.

To make a secure note, you simply open the Keychain Access utility and choose "New Secure Note" … Read more

Quick tip: Listen to the Google Sound Search history playlist

When you hear a song on the radio, or during a TV show, movie, or anywhere else, using the Google Sound Search widget is a quick way to identify it. Just tap the widget and it will start listening to the music. Once identified, you can find out more information.

The Sound Search widget also keeps a convenient history list of any tracks you've identified. To access it, just tap icon on the widget.

With the current Web version of Google Play Music, you would need to look up each track and add it to a playlist, since there'… Read more

Review: ToolBar 2000 creates a collapsable toolbar for quick access to programs and files

ToolBar 2000 creates a toolbar that pops out of the side of your screen to provide quick access to any programs and files you choose. This is a handy alternative to the Start menu or taskbar icons; and depending on how you use your computer, it could be a helpful tool. The created toolbar is completely customizable and easy to navigate, so you can set it up to suit your specific needs.

As soon as you open ToolBar 2000, you're ready to start using it. Hovering your mouse over the right side of the screen will cause the toolbar … Read more

How to control remote PCs for free now that LogMeIn Free is dead

Sad news: LogMeIn Free is no more.

For nearly a decade, it was my go-to tool for remote PC control -- not just my PCs, but also those of far-flung family members needing occasional help.

Alas, LogMeIn announced yesterday that, effectively immediately, there's no more free lunch. The next time you sign into your LogMeIn Free account, you'll have just 7 more days to use it. After that, plan on paying for a subscription.

Or not. LogMeIn wasn't the only free-remote-control game in town. Here are two other solutions for connecting to PCs from afar.

1. Join.… Read more

Google opens Glass purchase to All Access music users

Google is letting Google Music All Access users purchase a Google Glass Explorers device now.

The company is notifying users of its All Access music streaming service through e-mail, Gizmodo reported Tuesday. Google Glass Explorers is Google's test program for its wearable computing device.

It's been an exclusive group so far, with Google only allowing certain developers, contest winners and VIP users to purchase the device for $1,500. The company quietly put up a waiting list for the general public a couple months ago.

But, All Access users can buy Glass now. Google added the All Access integrationRead more

Will streaming music services ever make money? 2014 may tell

You'd be forgiven if you thought streaming music was the hottest business to be in right now.

At every turn in 2013, tech companies big and small were pouring into online music services. Longtime players like Spotify and Slacker launched new features or shook things up with updates. Giants like Apple and Google shoved their way to the front of the race with new services like iTunes Radio and All Access, ventures they believe will help sell phones and other products. Google can't seem to get enough, and is said to be rolling out another subscription service through YouTubeRead more

How to use facial recognition on your iPhone

iPhone and iPad users waiting for Apple to bring facial recognition to the iOS world may want to check out a couple of apps in the meantime.

A few different apps in Apple's App Store use the camera to identify your face, thereby granting access to certain stored information. The two apps that I took for a spin are FastAccess Anywhere and FaceCrypt. Both of them use facial recognition to lock and unlock specific content. How do they fare?

FastAccess Anywhere FastAccess Anywhere lets you use your face as a password to access any Web site that you choose.… Read more

Sprint ramps up 3G, adds Spark LTE network in Chicago

Sprint's data network in Chicago has gotten a boost, the company announced on Tuesday.

As part of its "rip and replace" initiative, Sprint removed old equipment on cell towers around Chicago and replaced it with new and improved technology that will deliver a more reliable 3G service in the city. The effort was part of a year-long initiative to improve Chicago's Sprint service, and included its fair share of downtime as it was being ramped up.

For its part, Sprint says that the new 3G network should fix those instability issues and improve data and voice … Read more

Memory makeover: DRAM days numbered as Japan eyes MRAM

A Japan-U.S. alliance is targeting a replacement for DRAM -- a longstanding staple of computer hardware.

More than 20 Japanese and US chip-related companies are joining forces to develop mass-production techniques for a next-generation chip technology called magnetoresistive random access memory, or MRAM, according to a report in Nikkei's Asian Review.

Players in the new research push include Tokyo Electron, Shin-Etsu Chemical, Renesas Electronics, Hitachi, and US memory giant Micron Technology.

The companies "will dispatch a few dozen researchers" to Tohoku University in northern Japan, according to Nikkei. The effort at Tohoku University will be led … Read more