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Brain scans could uncover dyslexia before kids learn to read

Dyslexia is a common learning disorder that affects around 1 in 10 people in the U.S., where it is typically diagnosed around second grade but sometimes goes undiagnosed and unmanaged well into adulthood. And though it is technically a learning disorder, it actually occurs in people with normal vision and intelligence, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Now researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston Children's Hospital say that a type of MRI scan called diffusion-weighted imaging could help diagnose the disorder in kids before they even start to learn to read -- a discovery that could … Read more

Faster brain scans offer new perspective on brain activity

Our brains are mysterious organs. And fast. Too fast, it turns out, to be fully observed using the current gold standard: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

So researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Institute of Technology and Advanced Biomedical Imaging at the University of Chieti in Italy are turning to faster technology called magnetoencephalography (MEG) to sample neural activity every 50 milliseconds.

In doing so, they've been afforded novel insights into the inner-workings of neural networks in resting and active brains. As the researchers report in the journal Neuron, these new insights could … Read more

Stop Android 4.3 from always scanning for Wi-Fi networks

Android 4.3 didn't bring many user-facing features to the latest iteration of Jelly Bean. There's the new dial-pad autocomplete that was long over due, and some under the hood improvements like Bluetooth Low Energy. There's another feature you may be surprised to hear about. Starting with Android 4.3 your device will continuously search for Wi-Fi networks, providing better location information, even if you have Wi-Fi turned off.

This isn't going to sit well with everyone, and thankfully Google included a way to disable the feature, it's just a bit hidden.

To disable Wi-Fi … Read more

Next iPhone could read your fingerprints

CNET Update will thumb wrestle an iPhone:

In this episode of Update:

- Expect fingerprint scanning in a future iPhone after biometric reader code was found in iOS 7.

- Don't let Dora invade dad's Netflix recommendations with new profiles rolling out in August.

- Access Comedy Central stand-up on the Xbox without paying for a cable subscription.

- Reap the benefits of the Overstock and Amazon book-pricing battle.

- See if Sprint's 4G LTE is available in your town, now that it added coverage to 41 markets.

- Check out the new free Zagat website and appsRead more

Court drops class-action status of Google digital book suit

A federal appeals court has decided that the lawsuit against Google's digital scanning of books shouldn't be classified as class-action suit just yet.

The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals said in New York on Monday that Circuit Judge Denny Chin should not have certified a class-action suit against Google, Reuters is reporting. By classifying the case as class action, the judge effectively allowed hundreds of thousands of authors to possibly net some cash in the ongoing lawsuit against the search giant.

Google and the Authors Guild have been embroiled in a lawsuit for nearly a decade. The Authors … Read more

School iris-scanned students without telling parents

There's a quaint concept that seemingly every technology company dismisses as outdated.

It's called opting in.

Should you not be familiar with it, it's the notion that you ought to choose before, say, all the people in your address book are contacted by a company they've never heard of.

And wouldn't it be lovely to have a choice over whether your kids should have their irises scanned, as they get on their school bus?

The parents of around 750 kids in several Florida schools never got that choice -- because of what might be politely … Read more

Review: Scan images with VueScan and your existing scanner

You've got a scanner, but to scan images into your PC, you need software like VueScan from Hamrick Software. VueScan is compatible with most flatbed and film scanners, and their software, which means you can use it without making any changes to your PC or existing scanner software. VueScan's processing features can restore faded colors and perform other professional-type adjustments, but it's also easy to use. VueScan is free to try, though the trial version places a watermark on saved images. The free trial might also support fewer devices, though the list of supported devices is so … Read more

Twitter attempts to beef up security

CNET Update is in the 'hood:

In this episode of Update:

- Learn how to make your Twitter account more secure from hackers. (But if won't be this simple for brand accounts that are used by more than one employee.)

- Get ready for J-Lo to shake up the mobile scene with her mobile company Viva Movil, which has partnered with Verizon.

- Lose the paper clutter and save your receipts digitally with the updated Google Drive app on Android.

- Find a neighbor to lend you sugar with the new Nextdoor app for iPhone.

CNET Update delivers the … Read more

Google Drive on Android scans receipts, adds Cards

Google Now's interface sensibilities are spilling over into other Google services.

The latest recipient of a healthy dose of the Now virtual assistant is Google Drive, which updated its Android app on Wednesday with several new features.

A new Scan feature lets you back up and track important receipts, business cards, and documents by using existing optical character recognition (OCR) tech already in Drive. Choose Scan from the "Add New" menu, take a photo of the document, and Drive will automatically turn it into a searchable PDF.

The new interface leverages the Cards look from Google+ and … Read more

3D scanning shows a butterfly's metamorphosis

Thanks to the magic of dissection, we have a pretty good idea of the changes that occur when a caterpillar spins its chrysalis and enters its metamorphosis -- the developmental stage that sees it move from the juvenile larval stage to the gorgeous adult life of a butterfly.

However, as you might have already guessed, dissection destroys the specimen, meaning that researchers are unable to follow the full development of a creature. We do know that the caterpillar will use enzymes to break down some of its proteins to reform; Scientific American called this a cocoon full of "caterpillar soup." However, scientists have performed research revealing that while some breakdown occurs, the idea of caterpillar soup is mostly wrong (but still gross).

Using micro-computed tomography, or micro-CT scanning, which uses X-ray imaging to re-create 3D cross-sections of the scanned object, Tristan Rowe and Russell Garwood from the U.K's University of Manchester and Thomas Simonsen from London's Natural History Museum have discovered exactly what happens to a painted lady butterfly inside the chrysalis. … Read more